John Deere Sighting: A Different Kind of Harvest

My friend Janice loves cotton- it says so right in her Twitter handle, @JPLovesCotton. She sent me this picture from harvest in her part of the world today. 

PickerThat's a John Deere 7760 Cotton Picker at work. The round things out in the field with it are modules. The 7760 has a built-in module builder and handler. Cotton is packed into a round module, covered with wrap, then rolled out of the builder chamber on to a handling ramp. When the driver reaches the headlands, the module is rolled off. It's non-stop cotton harvesting. 

Here's a 7760 working.

 

The modules themselves are pretty hefty- around 8 feet wide, 7,5 feet tall, and in the neighborhood of 5000 lbs each. The round shape gives them extra protection from elements, since water doesn't pool and there's wrap to keep them off the ground.

Module Mover ScreenGrab
There's a module mover that attaches to tractors to handle individual modules. 

Modules_truck
And they fit in standard module trucks and flat beds. 

I haven't seen a 7760 running in person yet, although I really want to some day. Maybe some year I'll get to take a Harvest field trip! 

 

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5 thoughts on “John Deere Sighting: A Different Kind of Harvest

  1. wow! the fabric of our lives is so… gigantic! I wonder how many shirts you can make out of a bale that size?

  2. Wow! I always found cotton amazing, mostly because I know nothing about it but that it makes great clothing!
    Thanks for this post!

  3. A square bale weighs about 500 lbs and will make roughly 1200 tshirts or 765 dress shirts.
    The round modules are 5000 lbs or better, so I’d say 120,000 tshirts or 7,650 dress shirts.
    Only 2100 pairs of jeans though.
    EDIT- Apparently, I didn’t have the math quite right- JP explained in the comment below. So ignore what I said

  4. I only know about it because the team who worked on the introduction of the 7760 sat next to me. They actually had to go Australia to get pictures of it for Intro because there wasn’t any cotton ready in the US.

  5. Tara, just got home and saw this. Thought I’d let you know the math on how many shirts is complicated by the fact square bales are already ginned, so that is 500 pounds of lint whereas the modules contain seed which is a higher weight. Different varieties have different seed weight too so tough to calculate til it is ginned.

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